Bipartisan Senate committee strongly implies Trump lied to Mueller

The Senate Intelligence Committee's report on Russian interference in the 2016 hinted pretty strongly at the possibility that President Trump lied to former Special Counsel Robert Mueller during his own investigation, which ended last year.The bipartisan Senate investigation did not find any evidence that Trump or his presidential campaign colluded with Russia to influence the election, but there is some language in the report implying the president may have twisted the truth.In a written response to questions from Mueller, Trump said he didn't "recall discussing WikiLeaks" -- which published Democratic emails hacked by Russian intelligence -- with his adviser Roger Stone. Stone was convicted for lying to Congress (only to have his sentence commuted by Trump). Trump also said he did not "recall being aware" that Stone discussed WikiLeaks with members of his campaign.The committee, however, came away with a different view, saying its investigation assessed that Trump actually spoke with Stone and other campaign staffers about Stone's access to WikiLeaks "on multiple occasions." Trump, for what it's worth, did not technically say he didn't speak with Stone or others about WikiLeaks, just that he didn't recall, but some observers are already wondering if this could come back to haunt him. > Feel like this is a crime someone who's no longer President could be indicted for https://t.co/BeNMddt8T7> > -- Karen Schwartz (@pithywidow) August 18, 2020More stories from theweek.com Postmaster general says he's suspending operational changes until after 2020 election. Critics aren't satisfied. Bill Clinton is getting sidelined at the DNC Democrats say they are unified — but around what?

Bipartisan Senate committee strongly implies Trump lied to Mueller

Bipartisan Senate committee strongly implies Trump lied to MuellerThe Senate Intelligence Committee's report on Russian interference in the 2016 hinted pretty strongly at the possibility that President Trump lied to former Special Counsel Robert Mueller during his own investigation, which ended last year.The bipartisan Senate investigation did not find any evidence that Trump or his presidential campaign colluded with Russia to influence the election, but there is some language in the report implying the president may have twisted the truth.In a written response to questions from Mueller, Trump said he didn't "recall discussing WikiLeaks" -- which published Democratic emails hacked by Russian intelligence -- with his adviser Roger Stone. Stone was convicted for lying to Congress (only to have his sentence commuted by Trump). Trump also said he did not "recall being aware" that Stone discussed WikiLeaks with members of his campaign.The committee, however, came away with a different view, saying its investigation assessed that Trump actually spoke with Stone and other campaign staffers about Stone's access to WikiLeaks "on multiple occasions." Trump, for what it's worth, did not technically say he didn't speak with Stone or others about WikiLeaks, just that he didn't recall, but some observers are already wondering if this could come back to haunt him. > Feel like this is a crime someone who's no longer President could be indicted for https://t.co/BeNMddt8T7> > -- Karen Schwartz (@pithywidow) August 18, 2020More stories from theweek.com Postmaster general says he's suspending operational changes until after 2020 election. Critics aren't satisfied. Bill Clinton is getting sidelined at the DNC Democrats say they are unified — but around what?